Understanding global catastrophic risk and its implications

Understanding global catastrophic risk and its implications
The world is full of different types of risk that impact human decision making on a daily basis. Risk that could lead to global catastrophe, however, is different. This type of risk is characterised by very low likelihood, but high consequences with global reach.  

The Indo-Pacific is exposed to catastrophic risks such as naturally occurring pandemics, nuclear exchange, climate change, and technological risks, and relationships between countries in the region will impact how these risks manifest. For instance, the trajectory of the China-US relationship could have an impact on biological, technological, and environmental risks – but there is also a role for countries to play in understanding, mitigating and preventing risks, as well as responding and recovering from risks.  

Join Hayley in this episode of 15 Minutes in Canberra to learn more about global catastrophic risk from Rumtin Sepasspour. Rumtin is a Research Affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk and has a background producing foreign policy and national security advice for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. Rumtin works closely with the global catastrophic risk community and, in this episode of the podcast, explains how he communicates the policy implications of these risks to a government audience.