The Deterrence and Defence Question

The Deterrence and Defence Question

The Deterrence and Defence Question

16 Feb 2018
The Deterrence and Defence Question
On 16 February 2018, the Perth USAsia Centre hosting a private roundtable luncheon with Dr David Santoro, Director and Senior Fellow, specialising in nuclear policy, at the Pacific Forum CSIS. At the luncheon Dr Santoro spoke about North Korea, focusing specifically on the deterrance and defence question. 

Key Takeaways:
  • It is counterproductive to argue that North Korea is a game changer. To do so would suggest that the U.S. is able to be deterred. It also signals to U.S. allies that the U.S. only worries about North Korea when the U.S. homeland is under threat.
  • There are three key things which can be done in response to the current situation in North Korea. Countries need to; adapt and strengthen their deterrence and defence capabilities, double down on sanctions, rallying states to both implement and enforce sanctions and engage in a dialogue with North Korea.
  • There are two main ways in which we can better strengthen our deterrence and defence. This can be done by enhacning nuclear information sharing with allies and giving a role to the Japanese and South Korea in U.S. nuclear operations. 
  • You cannot escape North Korea. North Korea is in the process of becoming much more of a formiable force. It is near becoming a full-fledged nuclear arms state which is able to hold the U.S. homeland hostage. North Korea must be dealt with, without distraction.  
 
Krystal Hartig is a Research and Program Assistant at the Perth USAsia Centre

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