Japan's Security Renaissance

Japan's Security Renaissance

Japan's Security Renaissance

By Krystal Hartig from Perth USAsia Centre | 10 Aug 2017

Japan's Security Renaissance teaser
Professor Andrew L. Oros, Professor of Political Science and International Studies and Director of International Studies at Washington College joined the Perth USAsia Centre to discuss the ideas in and launch his recent book Japan’s Security Renaissance: New Policies and Politics for the Twenty-First Century.

Key Takeaways
  • The US - Japan alliance remains a key aspect in the Indo-Pacific's security architecture.  The US - Japan alliance is very important for the stability of the Indo-pacific region and appears to be thriving when other traditional US alliances are being brought into question
  • Japan's security policy is evolving. There have been substantial changes in Japanese security policies and practices in the past decade. These include, but are not limited to; the creation of the Ministry of Defense in 2006/7, Japan’s National Security Strategy in 2013, and new security practices in Japan including “collective self defense.”
  • Historical legacies influence Japan's current and future security policies. This includes contested memories of the Pacific War, post-war antimilitarist security practices and the unequal security relation with the United States.
 
Krystal Hartig is a Research and Program Assistant at the Perth USAsia Centre

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